Episode 51 with Keisha Hickson

How To Overcome Complacency, Living With An Invisible Illness and The Power of Showing Up 

 

Keisha Hickson’s life changed when a diagnosis threatened her life expectancy. Faced with a renewed appreciation for time, Keisha is determined not to waste it and now urges us to combat complacency in all areas of our lives. This woman’s story is not just moving – it’s a masterclass in living life to the fullest despite the toughest of blows. Join us as we celebrate Keisha’s journey, explore the lessons she’s gathered along the way, and perhaps, find the encouragement we need to chase our own “Next Best Thing.” 

 

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Stay in touch with Keisha:

Website: https://keishahickson.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/keisha-hickson/

IG: https://www.instagram.com/thereal_keishahickson/

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Keisha, thank you so much for being here. Your story really just inspired me, and I just can’t wait for everybody to hear it.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Oh, thank you so much for having me.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Before we go too deep, I just want to really establish, what are some of the words that you would have used to describe a previous version of yourself. Thirty-seven year old Keisha, a mom, wife, who worked more than 20 years in the banking industry. How was she, that version of yourself, moving in the world?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Eight years ago? So, like you said, I worked for the bank for a long time. It was probably, at that point, about close to 20 years. I was a mom. I was a leader. I was a manager in sales, management. I was kind of, like, just going along with my day, with my life. I went to school. I graduated. I started a job, and my career was booming. My daughter was eight years old. She was flourishing. Life was okay. It was really just kind of like, steady, to be honest. I was just going through the motions, just going to work every day, living the American dream.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Were you chasing your dreams at that point, or were you just real comfortable?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I was extremely comfortable. Like, extremely comfortable at that point. Like I said, I was a Vice President at the bank. Everything was fine. I was coming home, taking Maddie to her extracurricular activities, doing some of my little community work. It was nothing earth shattering. I was just tootling along. It was great, though. It was really good. But I was comfortable. I wasn’t doing that much to push the envelope. I was enjoying life at that point.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

So tell us about that moment when you had an issue with your arm and you started going to the doctor. What did you think it was? And then what did you find out?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

What I thought it was? Absolutely nothing. I thought I just injured my elbow. The pain persisted. I seeked medical treatment. It was Martin Luther King weekend. I went to this urgent care place. I’m from Brooklyn on Flatbush and Prospect. That was the time when urgent care became, like, a popular thing. So instead of going to the ER, I said, oh, I’m just going to the urgent care, have a little x-ray. It’s nothing. It’s going to be fine. 

I will never forget the look on the doctor’s face because they took, like, a little preliminary x-ray, and she was in straight panic mode. She was like, something is wrong. You have to go see your orthopedic doctor. I was like, calm down. It’s okay.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

But it never in a million years, I thought what it ended up being. It was.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

What was it?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma a week later. So she made an appointment. She found orthopedic doctor for me to go to. She found one that day. She was like, he’s open tomorrow, which was Monday, which was Martin Luther King day. And I went to see him, and he told me, oh, it may be this. It may be that you may have to have surgery to prepare the elbow. I was like, okay.

But he goes, well, let’s do an MRI just to be on the safe side. Thursday. I went to read the results at his office, and it’s the second time now he met me, once was Monday and then on Thursday. And he said, Keisha, I know you’re a straight shooter. He goes, I can just tell. He said, something significantly is wrong with you. I made an appointment for you to go see an orthopedic oncologist at Mount Sinai.

I was, I’ll go. It’s not until I walked out the office, like, I played back the conversation in my head. I was like, this doctor, just say, orthopedic oncologist? No, he didn’t say that. I went to work, and I was at my desk, and I called him back. I was like, Dr. Patel, what are you really saying to me? He goes, Keisha, something significantly is wrong with you. Make sure you make that appointment. Okay? So I did, and that’s what started it. 

I honestly just thought I injured my elbow. I was going to have surgery to repair it. Never in a million years would I have thought they were going to tell me I have a rare, incurable blood cancer. Never!

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

When did you even start to process that diagnosis?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I don’t even think I allowed myself to process the diagnosis, because when I started doing research about it and when it said I had three to five years to live, I went into straight flight mode. I was, like, in the race against time to do all the things I wanted to do and also to live. Like, I immersed myself in reading about clinical trials, how the disease works, treatments in the pipeline. It was like I was just going and going and going. I started radiation. I started what’s called induction therapy, the beginning. Like, the first line of defense. They harvest my stem cells.

And I responded well to the initial treatment. So that was great. And I just kept going. I couldn’t stop. Of course, I had my moments. I’m not going to say I definitely had my moments alone. I had my moments, but I just had to keep going. My daughter was eight years old. I couldn’t leave her.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

And you were telling me how you were just really reevaluating everything in your life in that moment.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Everything. What was I really doing for the past 20 years? Yes. My career was great. I had a great time. It was very rewarding. I was very accomplished, very respected. But what was I really doing? Because you always think, like, you’re going to retire, and then you’re going to do all these things you want to do. My goal was one, to be a mother first. Right. So manage my career and be there for my daughter. 

So some of the things you kind of put off, you make sacrifices. She wants to go to gymnastics. You kind of put it off. And I really thought when I retired, then I would go into real estate or start a business. Just keep putting it off. Oh, I’ll get to it. I’ll get to it. I’ll get to it. But I was just like, no. What’s going to be my legacy? Like, I can possibly be dead before my 44th birthday. I wasn’t even 40 yet, right? I wasn’t even 40 yet. It was a wild ride.

And then also for me to be diagnosed with cancer. No one in my family has cancer. No one in my immediate family has cancer. My grandmother lived to be 95 years old. My mother’s mother. So it was a ride, and it’s still a ride. Because multiple myeloma is not curable. I live by diagnostic testing every two weeks. I’m on ongoing chemo treatment. So sometimes when people don’t, you don’t see it that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist, right? And sometimes I think people forget that I have this cancer because I’m just kind of, like, going along. But there’s days I don’t feel well. I’m suffering from chemo brain. My stomach is always upset. But you got to push through. I’ve just accepted that this is what my faith is. How do I make impact, right? How do I solidify my legacy? How can I help someone else?

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Talking about making impact, because that is what is your driving force right now. This is how you move. This is how you live, is to make impact. What did you realize about how you were moving before that you’re like, okay, I don’t want to do this anymore. This is not working for me anymore?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

How to make impact, especially living with multiple myeloma and thinking about how many opportunities I had to do different things, whether it’s career wise or a passion you may have that you never really developed, just chase your dreams. Start the book that you want to start, learn the second language, become involved in your community. 

So right now, for me, let’s take a little step back. In 2017, I opened my first business, which was shine and star kids salon, right? Because when I was like, well, if I pass away, they’re going to say, I just worked for this bank for 20 years. What else did I do? And I wanted my daughter to really understand, like, this happened. And in the event that I was to pass away, my mother took this situation, and it didn’t stop her. Right. To teach her resilience, because to be facing a death sentence, you have to be resilient.

Because I could have very well just said, well, this is it, and just sit back and wait and just let it play the course. But now we’re eight years later, and I’m doing well. I’m still here. I’m able to take care of myself. The disease is under control for the most part. If I didn’t use that to kind of push myself, I would have really wasted another eight years, right? So now I started Multiple Myeloma Matters, which is going to launch this month. I also started taking my public speaking business a little bit more serious. Like, over the past couple of years, I’ve been on a few panels here and there. But in the last six months, I really honed in on passing the message of, what’s the higher cost of complacency? Right? 

We all want to be comfortable. It feels good. We want to feel comfortable emotionally, financial but we don’t realize complacency sets in. We become complacent in various parts of our lives. Ten years ago, when we talk about complacency, I would always go to the work or my career. I need to go for that other promotion or try to make more money, get a bigger bonus. But it’s other parts of your life where you become complacent. And in the past few years, I really looked holistically. You may pick up one area, but another area kind of, like, falls off.

So as of lately, that is my message, is not wait until something critical happens or life changes for you to really say, you know what, let me go after it, because time is not refundable. It doesn’t have to be really a cancer diagnosis. There were things that happened in my life before that that should have triggered me into, like, all right, let’s reevaluate a couple of things. But it’s going to be that one thing for that person going to say, you know what? I have to make a shift. It could be divorce. It could be a layoff or some type of financial hardship. Or you come into a windfall of money, and now you have the resources to really go for that dream. I don’t want it to always be like it’s something negative, something positive could happen that can give you the courage to really just make that change. 

As of lately, also, I was asked to speak at a conference about invisible disabilities, and when the person approached me, I had to really think twice. But under the definition, I am disabled, and I am living with an invisible disability. Right. So this particular talk is around handling invisible disabilities in the workplace. Right. So that’s something that has come up. And again, I did some retrospect about that when I was still working for the bank and going through my treatment, the constant going to the doctor, you have to do FMLA. You don’t want to talk to your manager about it, how to go about it, because you want to be seen. Like, now you can’t perform your duties 

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Right.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

It definitely took me back to a time, so I’m happy to speak about that. That’s coming up in another week and a half. But just a lot of things you don’t really think about as you continuously move forward and just trying to get to the next step or keep moving forward, you forget all these little steps that got you to where you are. If that makes sense, I can talk forever.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

No, it completely makes sense. And for those that are listening and not watching on YouTube, Keisha is fly. She is fly, child. She got her red lips. She got her tangerine sweater on. She’s always fly. And I remember you showing me a picture of you. You were going to treatment, and I was like, you look so cute. You had this dress on. You had your lip, your hair all done. You’re all done. So I just wanted to know, what does showing up mean to you? Because that’s something you take very seriously, is how you’re showing up, not in terms of just what you look like, but just being present in the moment.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

This is a trick that I’ve always taught myself. In my corporate days, if I had a presentation or I had to go meet with a high net worth client to close the deal, I would get dressed up. I’ll be in the mirror talking to myself. Girl, this is it. Or if I was in a meeting and I felt like, I need to get it together real quick, I’ll run to the bathroom, and I’ll just look at myself in the mirror and say, Keisha, you got this. And I would just picture success in my mind. He’s going to say yes, he’s going to sign. I’m going to walk away with the business. And I’ve lived my whole life like that.

And that could also probably be from my upbringing, because my mother was the type of, no matter what’s going on in your life, when you step outside, you better have it all the way together. She was adamant about that. Press your clothes. Make sure you look good. Your coat, your hair, your nails. Nobody needs to know what’s really going on. Always show up. And I’ve carried that with me from my childhood days.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

You are the epitome of, you don’t look like what you’ve been through for sure. 

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I appreciate it 

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

And I just want to kind of go back to the idea of once you were diagnosed, and you have lived past the expectation already so we’re so grateful for that. In terms of, you could have had every reason to just say, this all just sucks. I’m just going to take it easy. I don’t need to do anything more. Look at what I’ve already done. You could have lived your life in a retrospective of just saying because you had done so much. You had your daughter. She’s beautiful. You know what I mean? She’s doing well. You didn’t have to do all of this, all of the stuff you’re doing now. You didn’t have to. Why?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I guess I didn’t have to. But, you know, I did accomplish a lot in my lifetime, but because I come from a strong sales background, so my sales cycle is from January to December. So whatever I did that year, when January 1 comes back around, I start over. Because when you’re in the sales culture, nobody really cares about what you did last year. Nobody cares. So I’ve always been like, this is great. I made it to the top in 2020, the leadership award, whatever accolades came with it. But January 1, life starts over, right? So that’s that part of that sales mentality of I got to keep kind of going.

And I couldn’t just stop because my daughter was eight years old and I wanted her to know, as a woman, growing up, a Black woman, things are going to happen in your life. And that’s just what it is. Things are going to happen. It’s what you do in the in between to overcome it. And that’s something that I tell everyone. Nothing is forever. Everything is temporary.

I’m successful in my own right. Just trying to have more of an impact, grow more, become a better person, impact more people. You know what I mean? 

So I remember one day I went to treatment at 52nd street in the city, and I sat down and this gentleman was there with his dad. His dad was newly diagnosed. This gentleman knows nothing about me. His father didn’t speak English, but the son did. And I was drinking, like, a mineral water. So the father was like, oh, my God, that’s so good for you. The son is translating. He said my dad just got diagnosed. I just gave him a kind word. At that point I was like four years in. I was like, listen, just take everything with a grain of salt and keep moving forward. We’re still in contact today. That kind word.

He lives in Bergen beach in Brooklyn. He’ll text me, happy New year. How are you? Dad is doing well. Just to be able to give someone the encouragement that I know is rough because I’m living it. It’s going to be okay. And that stuck with us. Stuck with us. His dad had pneumonia. He texted me, he goes, Keisha, dad has pneumonia. Please pray for him. Just that quick interaction made a difference in his life and mine. As a cancer patient, we look to support each other because we know what it’s like. Our friends want to support us and our family, but it’s one thing to live with the diagnosis and go through the treatment and the possibilities. And when the PET scan comes back and says this, and then what’s next? It’s a lot. So it’s a club I never wanted to be a part of, but I found myself here.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

What do you tell people when you’re speaking to them about complacency and how to address the areas of complacency in their lives? What questions do you tell people that they need to start asking themselves?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I kind of break it up in four parts. I do have a free complacency quiz you can take. Just break it up as far as your career, your personal life, your spiritual life. Like, when is the last time you did something for the first time? What is stopping you from chasing your dream or your goals? And I try to encourage them to say, listen, take baby steps. And you also have to make it part of your everyday life if you’re going to choose to learn to speak a second language. Take 20 minutes every day and practice. You have to build in that change into your everyday life and not to give up. Like, just keep going one foot in front the other 1ft in front of the.

So today I was at the gym and I had a thought. I was going to actually put in a post that I’m going to tell you. So I’m trying to prevent the start and stop over my lifetime. I will go work out for like six months, take a month off, and then you start off from ground zero. How do we prevent the start and stop?

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

That’s what I need.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Right. So this is how I choose to prevent the start and stop as it relates to me keeping to my workout. I changed. I went back to Orange Theory because I get bored easily. So that’s my way of preventing the start and stop is what I call it. Because I was, I got to figure something else out because I’m bored now. So this morning I went to Orange Theory. So I’ll go there for three months and then I’ll move to something else. So how do we prevent the start and stop? That is critical.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

You’re anticipating it instead of being surprised when it happens, when it always happens, and that this is how it goes. You’re anticipating it and planning ahead for it. And we talk a lot about, here in this community and the next Nuggets newsletter which it comes out every single Wednesday, is always breaking down the conversation and the little steps to what you’re saying that little steps add up over time. And I saw something on I’m going to mess this up. I think it was like on TikTok, I’m going to mess it up. But it was to the effect of procrastination is kind of like arrogance, thinking that God will give you another chance. The delay in putting things off is kind of like the expectation that time is limitless. Like that you’ll get another shot, that you’ll get another day, that you’ll get another opportunity, as opposed to seizing the moment right now.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Right. So we all say these things like it’s procrastination, exactly what you just said. Or even like, 9/11 me and my sister in law who was actually in the building, we always say, no, those people took their chicken out before they left home to come home and cook dinner, and they never made it back home. But I think until something happens to you where you really, like, I have to make a shift. You have to come to that realization yourself. I can talk to you as much as I want, go through every exercise, every scenario, but you or yourself have to own it. And that’s part of my framework, which is self empowerment. Right. Part of it, you have to kind of forgive yourself for not taking the step before and take the step. Now explain that.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Forgiving yourself. Explain that. I’ve never thought about it that way.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

So something’s going to happen at work. Let’s say you get a phone call. You’re like, oh, I should just shift. Maybe I should have went to this other company, right? And then guilt kind of sets in. You feel like, oh, it’s too late. How am I going to go about it now? I let the position pass, and it also kind of puts you back emotionally. And then you just sit with it again, and then you just go back to doing the same thing tomorrow. But I think a part of it is. I don’t think, I know, part of it is you have to say, give yourself permission to say, I forgive myself and I grant myself permission to move forward. Because a lot of times we only see the action and the results. There’s a lot of things that happen before we actually take action. There’s your thoughts, your beliefs, your emotions play a big part in you deciding whether to move forward or not. Right. Part of your emotions are also fear. What are you afraid of? Fear of change. Fear of the unknown. Fear of not being successful. Fear of what someone else may think. Right. Or even fearful to put that extra thing in your life. Because sometimes I go, my plate is so full, how can I do this? Watch TV 30 minutes less. There’s always a time that you can kind of fit in these little small steps. Like you said, little baby steps add up. So you have to give yourself permission.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

You’ve talked about legacy a bit. What do you want your legacy to be?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

I definitely would like my legacy to live on. That I use my cancer diagnosis to empower others, especially women. Because I feel like women are always waiting, waiting to retire, waiting for their kids to finish school or waiting for their husband to get the promotion before they do what they want to do. How do I inspire others to start taking the steps to change? I dare you to change. There’s growth, there’s happiness, and there’s legacy on the other side of complacency. Even for myself, I still struggle with this sometimes. I have this whole plan, I’m going to do this on Wednesday, and sometimes I don’t feel like it, but I have to do it because I’m never going to get this Wednesday back.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

How do you live, where I’ve heard people who have had cancer and you kind of referenced it here a little bit where you’re going from scan to scan, where you’re not just in that hyper vigilance or that anxiety? How do you address that?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Oh, my God. So the scans are the scans, and I go to the doctor every other week. Last year is the first year I had a real moment when I took my PET scan and biopsy last year, it came back that I may be going the wrong way, meaning the cancer is growing. And for, like, three months, I did the bare minimum because now what’s my life going to be like on a new treatment plan? Am I going to respond to the new treatment plan? Can I function on the treatment plan? Because right now I function well on the current chemotherapy I’m on. Like, I’m sick a couple of hours here and there, but for the most part, I’m okay. It’s a lot. It’s definitely mentally tasking. Right.

I didn’t even tell anybody about that last year, because now it’s kind of like I have to manage them and me. Keisha, how you feeling? When you go back to the doctor? What are they going to say? So I didn’t even tell anybody until the second biopsy came about. And I actually talked about this year in January, on my anniversary date. It was important for me to talk about it because I don’t want to put off, everything is great. I want to give you a real reality of what it is living with a critical illness. They are very scary moments, right? You wake up in the middle of night, you have palpitations. You’d be like, what’s happening? 

It’s always something to think about. When I take the blood test, what is it going to say? So it’s difficult, but I’ve just kind of put it into my routine. This is my life. This is my new normal, right? If I want to travel, I have to move my doctor’s appointments around. There are certain things I need to be cautious of, like picking up certain diseases, because I am immunocompromised. When I do travel, I have to walk with wipes, wipe down the airplane, the tray, the arms. I take precautions. But it’s part of my DNA now.

It is what it is, and I always look at the brighter side of things. I’m able to do all the things I can do while I’m on treatment and still fighting this critical illness, because it really could be worse. It really could be worse.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

I love your perspective. I love your perspective, and I love how you’re managing this. And I was telling you that my cousin had multiple myeloma, and she was the exact same way. She always went on the trip, even before it. She enjoyed herself. She enjoyed her life. And even when she had dialysis, and that’s just really hard to manage in terms of traveling and stuff, she still traveled, you know what I mean? She still went with the kids. She did all of the things, and she fully enjoyed herself. 

We were very close. She has been an inspiration in my life and really was a catalyst to me changing my attitude and changing years ago. Because she would always say, you just have to get on with it. You know, she’s from England, and so she’d just be know, well, she’d tell me everything that was going on. She’d be like, well, you just have to get on with it. You just have to get on with it.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

And that’s kind of how I feel about it. And you asked me a question, how do I deal with it? Because I know it could be worse. Multiple myeloma affects your kidneys. So far, it hasn’t affect mine. I do not secrete the N protein. So there’s different levels to multiple myeloma, aggressive versus non aggressive. So those are the things that I look to that I am doing well, because if I had to go to dialysis three times a week, my life would be a little bit different. I wouldn’t be able to do probably 80% of the things I’m able to do.

Multiple myeloma also affects your spine because those are smaller bones. My spine is intact. I have lesions other places, but my back is 100% intact. So I always look to the brighter side of things. It could be worse.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

And your work is far from done.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

So outside of having multiple myeloma, I had blood clots three times, pulmonary embolisms three times. Right. So I’m here for a reason. He’ll scare me every now and again. Like, get it together. I have you down here for a reason, and I’m going to live true to that. I made it through COVID so many things. I’m still here, so I’m going to use my time wisely and hopefully make an impact. Leave my legacy, and I will be here for another 40 years. I’ve made up in my mind that I’m going to live another 40 years.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

I co sign that. I co sign that I believe it.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Between God and the medical advancements in the myeloma space, so many new drugs have been approved since I’ve been diagnosed, and Lord knows what’s in the pipeline, so I’m convinced I’m going to be here, get used to me.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

And all of your fabulousness.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Thank you.

 

ACT UP Segment 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

The last segment is ACT UP where we ask people how to get from where you are to where you want to be. If somebody’s listening to this right now and feeling like, man, I am complacent in this very specific area of my life, what’s one thing they can do today to get them closer to where they want to be?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

Okay, so I’m going to tell you what I tell when I’m doing my talks or coaching. I’m going to give you three things to think about, or three goals. I want you to think of a short goal, something you can do in four weeks. Sometimes we get overwhelmed with these big, grandiose, oh, I’m going to just paint the whole house. Let’s just start with the closet. Give yourself a task that you can complete and feel good about yourself. And it could be cleaning out the garage, organizing your cabinets. 

Pick a short goal, complete it, document how you feel about it. How did it make you feel to finally scratch that off the list, then move to another goal? Let’s say a time frame of two to six months. Complete it, and then let’s go for the big one, the twelve month goal. And just chip away at it. Right? When we set these goals, similar to these vision board parties, I think it’s important to really understand what you need to be successful. Right? People, skills, any external factors that may come up and be realistic of what’s going on in your life, your current workload, your family obligations. But weave it in, right? That six month goal may take you twelve months, but the key is do something every day or on schedule. If you’re going to work on it Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, stick to it. The same way. How we show up to work every day. Show up for yourself every day. I dare you to change. Dare to change.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

That’s a dare. That’s a dare. I love that. I really love how you frame that. How can we keep in contact with you? How can we support you?

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

You can follow me on LinkedIn.  Or you can go to my website, keishahickson.com, and schedule a call with me if you want to talk more about how I can help you come from a place of complacency to inspire productivity. I do take calls, 15 minutes, consultation calls, and see how we can work together. And you can also download my free complacency quiz. And you can go through the quiz. It will tell you the parts of your life that you are complacent, and then you could decide which one you want to tackle first.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Keisha, you are such an inspiration. I’m so glad we met at that breakfast. I’ve been thinking about our conversation ever since. Honestly. And I can’t wait to support you and show up at your events because you are super special. And you are right that your impact, like, you’re just scratching the surface of your impact. It’s going to be bigger than you can even imagine.

Continued prayers for healing and good health. And good, likewise.

 

Keisha Hickson, Resilience Advocate

It’s been a pleasure meeting you. We met like, maybe two weeks ago. We had a great time at breakfast. Thank you for all your encouragement, your tips about media and how I can move forward. I love the conversation. I look forward to us expanding our relationship our  friendship. And also likewise, anything I can do to support you as well. Please. I’m only a phone call away.

 

Aundrea Cline-Thomas, Host

Likewise

 

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